How To Get Recruited For College Tennis

Here’s how to get recruited for college tennis. If you love the game, I mean really love it and want to play it at the next level, then I’ll give you a few tips and secrets that will help you to take your game there.

There is nothing like getting a chance to represent your school, your game, your skills in a college match. I love tennis. It’s one of my lifetime sports 😉

I love playing against my dad to because he has a tricky little lefty spin that keeps me guessing and on my toes (plus he is 6′ 3″, quick, and has a wide wing span).

“Anyhoo, because of my experience with high school sports, recruiting, and coaches… I have dedicated my life to helping athletes like yourself to get to play their sport in college, to get a degree, and to be a better player than they have ever imagined that they could be.”

With that said:

How To Get Recruited For College Tennis

Secret #1: Being good isn’t good enough. Just because you are a good tennis player (or great or the best) doesn’t mean that college coaches are going to find you.

You aren’t going to magically appear up on their radar.

So, being a good tennis player (which is determined by each coach differently & based on need also) is the first most important aspect in being recruited as a tennis player… But it’s only the start.

Secret #2: Colleges coaches goal… get as many great players as cheap as possible. At the Div I level, Men’s tennis has 5 total scholarships that they have to build a whole team with.

This usually means that there a lot of tennis players that are getting partials or no money at all. But that doesn’t mean that they don’t get more money from other “financial aid awards” (this is a topic for a whole ‘nother post).

For women there is 12 scholarships, but it’s handled differently.

For women, each athletic scholarship given out counts against the school as a full.  It’s because women’s tennis is what they call a “head count” sport.

So, the point is that coaches feel that they are limited on money, but they still have to win if they want to keep their jobs and continue doing what they love.

So, they have a lot of pressure to put together a team by giving out partials mixed with other types of “financial aid awards”.

Secret #3: Everything is up for negotiation. While you are going through the recruiting process, everything is up for negotiation.

If you need more money, then you just have to be honest (but kind) that that is what you need.

Sometimes it will come from an athletic award and sometimes the school can give money from another financial aide source, but in the end, it only matters how much you come out of pocket.

Secret #4: Most athletic scholarships a partials. Which brings me to this point… most athletic scholarships are partials.

But there is a “whole-lotta” financial aid money out there that the school can award to who ever “they” see has the “need” for it.

This IS NOT based on “financial status”.

Again for women’s tennis (in this case) it’s slightly different because whether you were to give you a full or not, it still counts as a “full tennis scholarship” towards the school.

So, they are more likely to give fulls to women tennis players.

Secret #5: You have to “be eligible” first. If you don’t have the grades, don’t have the SAT or ACT test scores that match on a “sliding scale” and you don’t have them sent in to the NCAA Eligibility Center (Clearinghouse), then you can’t play in the NCAA.

That’s pretty black and white.

If you ‘wanna’ play your game in NCAA then you have to get & keep your GPA up, take a score nicely on the SAT/ACT and get registered with the Eligibility Center.

Secret #6: Getting noticed, starts with your action. Most student athletes have the: “build it and they will come” attitude.

But that is why there are so many athletes that don’t get recruited.

They are basing their knowledge on “the exception” instead of “the rule”.

The rule is that most 90%+ of all high school and junior college athletes will not be seriously recruited because they think that the coaches are suppose to contact them first.

No No No.

They don’t have enough resources, money, and time to search and find all the good athletes across the country.

So, you have to help them.

And NOOOOO not with some $3,000 recruiting package from a service either.  That’s lame to me.

This is still just scratching the surface, and I’d love to teach you more about how to get recruited for college tennis. I’ve also created a membership area for those who are really serious about going to the next level and getting recruited to play in tennis in college.

Thanks for talking with me, and always always always rootin’ for ya,

Kenney Jr.

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